Growing up with emotional abuse makes you want to avoid people when you feel bad instead of seeking someone out.

Growing up with emotional abuse makes you want to avoid people when you feel bad instead of seeking someone out.

Because your abuser always told you you weren’t really upset.

Or that what you’re upset about is trivial.
Or that you’re overreacting again.
Or that your being upset is ruining everyone else’s mood. Or that you’re being a baby.

Or that you need a thicker skin.
Or you’re told to go away until you can be a decent person again.

You believe your feelings don’t matter unless you express the “right” ones the “right” way at the “right” time, and you can never do it “right.”

You believe everybody has it worse, so there’s no point in talking about it when you feel bad.

It’s easier to isolate yourself when you’re sad, angry or hurt because it feels easier than “inflicting” yourself on somebody else.

It’s easier to isolate yourself when you’re sad, angry or hurt because it feels easier than “inflicting” yourself on somebody else.

Even when there are beautiful people in your life who say you can always come to them, you still don’t because you’re scared.

That is what sits at the center of who a lot of people are. It’s like an abscess that won’t pop or drain. And when it hurts, it hurts.

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